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Pupil Premium 2013-2014

The Pupil Premium funding is allocated to schools from the Department for Education for all children who are entitled to Free School Meals, Looked after Children and the children of parents serving in the armed services.

At Gilbert Colvin Primary School we are committed to ensuring that all our children achieve and make excellent progress regardless of their gender, ethnic background, family income or background.

The progress of all children is regularly tracked throughout the year to ensure no individuals or groups of children fall behind. Where required, interventions are put into place so that children can catch up. The pupil premium funding has allowed us to finance a wide variety of interventions and strategies which are detailed below.

The success of these strategies is evaluated regularly to check their impact on the progress of our pupils. Where a strategy has not been successful it may be adapted or discontinued to ensure that what we are doing is worthwhile and so that we achieve good value for money.

Allocation of Pupil Premium Funding 2012-13

How was the Pupil Premium spent in 2012-13?

Allocation of Pupil Premium Funding 2013-14?

How was the Pupil Premium spent in 2013-14?

How was the Pupil Premium spent in 2013-14?

The Impact of these strategies on Pupil Premium children in 2013

This is judged on how well our children did as compared to other Pupil Premium (PP) children nationwide and compared to the other children in our school. This also includes ‘the gap’ between these two groups’ achievement and whether as a school we are closing these ‘gaps’.

Overall our PP children make very good progress and do better than PP children in other schools nationally and are closer in achievement to their peers than nationally. Our PP children do less well at Level 5+ in Reading and Maths and this is an area for improvement.

Since 2011 the in-school gap for children achieving level 4 is closing in Maths/ Reading/ Writing combined from -12% to -6%. However since 2012 the gap has widened from +7 to -6 in Maths/ Reading/ Writing combined but this was due to the higher attainment of all pupils and those who were Pupil Premium also consisted of a higher number of children with Special Needs.

Since 2012 the gap has also closed at level 4 or more in Reading from -2% (English 2012) to +12%, in Writing from -2% (English 2012) to +6% and in Maths from -12% to -6%.

The gap in progress since 2012 has also closed from in Maths from -2% to +4%. The gap in Reading and Writing is +7% and 0% which means Pupil Premium do as well if not better than non-Pupil Premium but this is below English in 2012 which was +16.

At the end of Early Years Foundation Stage (Reception):

  • 100% of children were at the expected level in the core areas of Communication and Language; Physical Development and Personal, Social and Emotional development.
  • 40% of children were at the expected level for Literacy (80% in Reading and 40% in Writing) and 40% in Mathematics.

In the Phonics Reading test in Year 1:

  • 75% of children passed the test which was well above national. The gap between PP children and the other children was 17%.

This is judged on how well our children did as compared to other Pupil Premium (PP) children nationwide and compared to the other children in our school. This also includes ‘the gap’ between these two groups’ achievement and whether as a school we are closing these ‘gaps’.

Overall our PP children make very good progress and do better than PP children in other schools nationally and are closer in achievement to their peers than nationally. Our PP children do less well at Level 5+ in Reading and Maths and this is an area for improvement.

Since 2011 the in-school gap for children achieving level 4 is closing in Maths/ Reading/ Writing combined from -12% to -6%. However since 2012 the gap has widened from +7 to -6 in Maths/ Reading/ Writing combined but this was due to the higher attainment of all pupils and those who were Pupil Premium also consisted of a higher number of children with Special Needs.

Since 2012 the gap has also closed at level 4 or more in Reading from -2% (English 2012) to +12%, in Writing from -2% (English 2012) to +6% and in Maths from -12% to -6%.

The gap in progress since 2012 has also closed from in Maths from -2% to +4%. The gap in Reading and Writing is +7% and 0% which means Pupil Premium do as well if not better than non-Pupil Premium but this is below English in 2012 which was +16.

At the end of KS1 (Year 2):

  • In Reading PP children did better than nationally with a score of 16.1 APS points.
  • In Writing PP children did better than nationally with a score of 13.9 APS points.
  • In Maths PP children did better than nationally with a score of 15.7 APS points.
  • The gap between the PP children and the other children has been closed and was smaller than the national gap: Reading 0.5%; Writing 0.3% and Maths 0.4%.

At the end of KS2 (Year 6):

Progress

  • In Writing PP children did better than nationally with 100% of pupils making expected progress and 78% making more than expected progress.
  • In Reading PP children did better than nationally with 100% of pupils making expected progress and 33% making more than expected progress.
  • In Maths PP children did better than nationally with 100% of pupils making expected progress and 11% making more than expected progress (below national).

Attainment

  • In Maths, Reading and Writing combined PP children did much better than nationally with 78% at level 4 or above. The gap between PP and other children was also smaller than nationally.
  • In Reading and Writing PP children achieved 100% level 4 or above which was well above the national. The gap here was reversed so PP children did better than other children.
  • In Maths 78% achieved level 4 or above. This was similar to the national picture for PP children as was the gap between the PP children and other children
  • At level 5 PP children achieve similar to PP children nationally in Maths, reading and Writing combined.
  • In Maths and Reading PP children do less well than nationally at level 5.
  • In Writing PP children do better than nationally.
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